Women's History in the GGNRA

At every turn in GGNRA and national park history, there are women and non-binary people who have overcome adversity to make lasting impacts in and around these lands. Women like LaNada War Jack, who helped lead the Occupation of Alcatraz to advance Indigenous civil rights globally. There is Amy Meyer, who tirelessly fought to establish the GGNRA as a national park. Betty Reid Soskin helped establish our neighboring Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park and became the oldest ranger to work for the National Park Service. Tye Leung Schulze, who worked on Angel Island, became the first Chinese Women to cast a vote in the United States. There are countless other women, especially women of color, whose stories are not currently known or told, who have greatly shaped the parks that we know and love.

Today, women continue to blaze trails throughout the parks as rangers, biologists, visitors, and leaders. Join us in celebrating the lasting impacts women have had in the parks by learning about some of their stories below—if you know of a women’s history story in the parks that hasn’t been told, please let us know at media@parksconservancy.org!

Ranger Mia Monroe in Muir Woods.
Gateways Article
Park Ranger Mia Monroe is the Marin Community Liaison for the NPS, and one of the longest serving employees in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.
Graphic with photos of people in the parks
Events
Online/Virtual
Join us for an interactive screening and learn about ways you can craft your own personal Earth Story.
National Park Ranger Alanna Smith in the Presidio.
Park E-Ventures Article
"We’re always on the lookout for what stories are not being told, whose perspectives we have not heard in some of our stories," says Park Ranger Alanna Smith. Meet Ranger Alanna and learn about how she and the NPS are interpreting stories at the Presidio and beyond.
Amy Meyer speaks at an event.
Article
Read inspiring words from Amy Meyer, who was crucial to the formation of the GGNRA 50 years ago.
Nature Boost: Women of the Marin Headlands
Our Work
In recognition of Women’s History Month, National Park Ranger Lara Volski provides a look at different women who have played a role in the history, stewardship, and preservation of the seaswept bluffs and coastal prairies just north of the Golden Gate Bridge
Park Ranger Giessell Aguilar at Muir Woods.
Article
Ranger Giessell is doing fascinating work uncovering untold stories at Muir Woods, and using her own history to connect with the wide range of visitors to the redwoods.
SFPL Herstory Cover Photo
Our Work
Online/Virtual
Meet the women behind the construction of the new Presidio Tunnel Tops project in this live panel facilitated by a Crissy Field Center youth leader. Learn about the Presidio Tunnel Tops project and hear about the all-women project management team’s journeys to careers building parks.
Alison Forrestel looks up for a smile among vegetation plots.
Article
As part of a larger effort to highlight the dynamic women doing science in our parks, we are featuring Alison Forrestel, Natural Resources & Science Chief at Golden Gate National Recreation Area. What’s it like to hold a leadership role at such a huge, urban National Park? Read Alison’s story...
Women's Trail Day volunteers at a past event in the Golden Gate National Parks.
Article
What is it about an all-women, volunteer workday that makes us feel important, of value, and special? In the #MeToo movement era, women are committed to making a space for ourselves and to come together as a community.
Women’s Dipsea Hike
Park E-Ventures Article
One hundred years ago, a historic “hike” from Mill Valley to Stinson Beach marked a major breakthrough for women’s cross-country running. The Parks Conservancy and One Tam are proud to support a community commemoration of the Women’s Dipsea Hike on April 21, 2018.
Penny Tibbetts
Park E-Ventures Article
Penny Tibbetts, a law enforcement ranger at Golden Gate, recounts her journey in becoming the first ranger in the National Park Service to transition genders while on duty.
Amy Meyer at National Trails Day, 2014
Park E-Ventures Article
One of the earliest residents of Yerba Buena. A pioneering dairy rancher during the Gold Rush era. And a woman who, for U.S. servicemen in WWII, became synonymous with San Francisco. In honor of Women’s History Month, read their stories and more.

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