Native Plants

Osoberry (Oemleria cerasiformis, Rosaceae family) leaf detail, Presidio Native Plant Nursery.
May 11, 2010
The Seed and Plant Lab features high-efficiency heating and refrigeration systems and provides an ideal space for processing, storing, and treating over 300 batches of seeds used to grow plants for park restoration projects.
Coyote Brush
Park E-Ventures Article
Our trees may not change even a hue and our weather may not get much chillier, but you can find hints of more “traditional” autumn phenomena in the Golden Gate National Parks. Save yourself the plane ticket to the Northeast, and find the fall in the national parks in your...
Wild Cucumber, or California Manroot, (Marah fabaceus, Cucurbitaceae family), along the Battery East Trail, Presidio
Park E-Ventures Article
Most of the year, we like to feature soft, picture-perfect native plants that beckon you to frolic in the parklands. But for Halloween, we’re profiling the ghoulish wild cucumber, which features some diabolically scary fruit—and a terrifying rate of growth.
Mountain Lake Park
Park E-Ventures Article
Dive back into the weird world of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), as we see how nursery staff and interns are demystifying the growing process for these fascinating plants that live beneath the surface of Mountain Lake in the Presidio.
Presidio Native Plant Nursery staff
Park E-Ventures Article
Curious about how and why we need our Native Plant Nurseries to grow plants for restoration? Check out the second installment of the “Seed to Ecosystem” podcast for insightful interviews with nursery staff and one of our star volunteers.
Drought Tolerant Native Plant Gardening
Park E-Ventures Article
With our unusually dry winter, you might be wondering what you can do at home to help reduce water usage. Liz Ponzini (Manager of the Tennessee Valley Nursery) shares her expertise, and tips you can use in your own backyard!
California Wild Rose blooms on the Battery East Trail steps.
Park E-Ventures Article
A green lawn all year-long? Nowhere near as fascinating or entertaining as the transformation of native plants from one season to the next.
Park E-Ventures Article
Valentine’s Day not exactly your favorite holiday? Just for you incurable curmudgeons—here’s a bouquet of plants with some less-than-romantic names that you certainly won’t be hearing about in any love sonnet.
Mountain Lake Park
Park E-Ventures Article
You may have heard about the incredible restoration effort going on at Mountain Lake in the Presidio, but did you know that this project also entails learning about and growing mysterious (and slightly stinky) submerged aquatic plants? Plunge in for a soggy adventure.
Franciscan Manzanita
Park E-Ventures Article
Some have asked: Why don’t we just buy plants from our local nurseries to restore the park? In short, the Parks Conservancy grows native plants from seed because such a practice increases the chances of the plants’ survival.