Wildlife

salamander
Park E-Ventures Article
Learn how populations of the Ensatina split in the Central Valley and discover how this little salamander—the textbook definition of a “ring species”—vividly illustrates how nature frustrates the human compulsion to classify and categorize species.
Downy Woodpecker
Park E-Ventures Article
We often think about members of a species gathered together, such as “a gaggle of geese,” or a “pack of wolves.” But there are also examples of different species coming together, often to hunt or avoid being hunted. Read on to learn about one animal alliance.
bats
Park E-Ventures Article
Have you ever looked up at the twilight sky to see an erratic flutter of wings? Maybe you tried to convince yourself that it was just a sparrow, but chances are what you actually saw was a little brown bat. Although bats carry a loathsome reputation, humans derive a great...
Park E-Ventures Article
Early last month, dog walker Debra Wood came across an extremely rare sight at Calera Creek in Pacifica: coast garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans terrestris) massing near the creek! Read on to learn more about this amazing natural phenomenon.
Mission blue butterfly (Icaricia icariodes missionensis)
Park E-Ventures Article
A bright flash passes by, triggering someone to yell “BLUE!” Team members nimbly make their way through a mosaic of summer lupines at Oakwood Valley. Quickly but carefully, one person follows the butterfly until it lands. “It’s a mission blue, male, resting on a lupine.” Read on to learn more.
Redwood Creek restoration.
Park E-Ventures Article
Volunteers with Marin’s Park Stewardship team have been gathering together branches and sticks, lashing them together, and dumping them in Redwood Creek. Some strange ritualistic behavior? Or evidence of restoration science at work? Find out by reading on.